2.10.2016

Citation of/in Digital Media


More and more digital media projects are becoming part of scholarly work. Students need to know how to cite the materials or media that they find to use in their projects. Below are some general tips and then examples of how to cite different types of media in three common styles.





General Tips




Citing Audio Files

Creative Commons

Structure:
  1. Title of the song/track.
  2. Author/Creator of the image
  3. Source
  4. License

Example:

“This video features the song "Desaprendere (Treatment)" by fourstones, available under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial license.”

MLA

Structure:
  1. Creator last name, creator first name
  2. Title (italicized)
  3. Any additional performers are listed here – first name followed by last name
  4. When citing a performance, list the date of the performance here, with the abbreviation “rec.” preceding the date
  5. Manufacturer and year published/issued
  6. Indicate the original audio format (CD, audiocassette, etc.)
  7. Title of the database or Web site (italicized)
  8. Medium (Web)
  9. Date of access
  10. URL (in angle brackets) – optional
Last name, First name. Song title. Perf. First name Last name. Rec. Day Month
     Year. Manufacturer, Year. Original format. Title of the Web site. Web. Day
     Month Year of access. <opt. URL>.

Example:

Scott, Mrs. Ben, and Myrtle B. Wilkinson. Haste to the Wedding. Rec. 31 October
     1939 by Sydney Robertson Cowell. 78 rpm. Lib. of Cong. Web. 27 Jan.
     2016. <http://www.loc.gov/item/afccc.a4227b4>.

APA

Structure:
  1. Creator’s or performer’s last name, first initial, middle initial (if given) (include composer, performer, lyricist, etc.).
  2. Date (in parentheses). (Year) or (Year, Month Day). Use n.d. for no date.
  3. Title of album (in italics) Title of a song is neither italicized nor uses quotations. Capitalize only the first word and proper nouns.
  4. Description of format (in brackets) [sound recording].
  5. URL (use bibliographic record URL or shorter digital id if available at bottom of bib record).
  6. Last name, First initial. Middle initial. (Date). Title of work. [Format.] Retrieved from http://...

Example:

Scott, Mrs. B. and M. B. Wilkinson, performers. (31 October 1939). Haste to the
     wedding [Sound recording]. Retrieved from
     http://www.loc.gov/item/afccc.a4227b4.




Citing Images

Creative Commons

Structure:
  1. Title of the image.
  2. Author/Creator of the image
  3. Source
  4. License

Example:


Creative Commons 10th Birthday Celebration San Francisco" by tvol is licensed under CC BY 2.0

This is an ideal attribution because there is a title, "Creative Commons 10th Birthday Celebration San Francisco," an author, "tvol," - linked to his profile page; a source, "Creative Commons 10th Birthday Celebration San Francisco," - linked to original Flickr page and the type of  license "CC BY 2.0" - linked to license deed.

MLA

Structure:
  1. Artist last name, artist first name
  2. Title (italicized)
  3. Date of composition
  4. Format (photograph)
  5. Institution that houses the work, city where the piece is located
  6. Title of the database or Web site (italicized)
  7. Medium (Web)
  8. Date of access
  9. URL (in angle brackets) – optional

Last name, First name. Title. Date of composition. Photograph. Institution,
     City. Title of the Web site. Web. Day Month Year of access.
     <opt. URL>.

Example:

O'Sullivan, Timothy H. Incidents of the War. A Harvest of Death. c1865.
     Photograph. Lib. of Cong., Washington D.C. Lib. of Cong.Web. 27
     Jan. 2016.
     <http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/cwp2003001110/PP/>.

APA

Structure:
  1. Photographer’s last name, first initial, middle initial (if given).
  2. Date (in parentheses). (Year) or (Year, Month Day). Use n.d. for no date.
  3. title of photograph italicized if it is a stand-alone document, no italics or quotations if it is part of a larger work, with only the first word and proper nouns capitalized.
  4. Description of format (in brackets).
  5. URL (use bibliographic record URL or shorter digital id if available at bottom of bib record).
Last name, First initial. Middle initial. Title of work (include brackets if the
     title does so) [Format description]. Retrieved from http://....

Example:

O’Sullivan, T. (1863, July). [Incidents of the war. A harvest of death,
     Gettysburg, July 1863] [Photograph]. Retrieved from
     http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/cwp2003001110/PP.

2.05.2016

3D Printing Health Risks?


We came across an article pointing out some possible heath risks associated with 3-D printing. Read up and be careful when you print. 

From the article: "What they found was that the level of harmful particles and fumes depended mostly on the filament material, not the maker of the printer. For example, ABS emitted styrene, a type of chemical that's toxic and carcinogenic. Other materials based on nylon emitted caprolactam, a chemical linked to a laundry list of health problems. Meanwhile, the PLA filament emitted lactide, which is actually pretty benign. All told, the levels of ultrafine particles reached concentrations 10 times as high as a normal office or lab."

Here is the ​ [Full Article @ Fast Company]​.

Here is a link to the study referenced in the article: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/acs.est.5b04983

Image courtesy of: http://fc05.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2013/187/d/3/vancouver_hackspace_3d_printer_demo_by_nyxchaotica-d6c8evc.jpg

2.01.2016

Teaching and Learning: Doodling

I came across the video below about doodling. I wonder what instructors thoughts are on doodling, both for students doodling in class and for themselves. I wonder whether or not students doodle and if they have realized any benefits from doing so.

In the video Sunni Brown makes the assertion that we should doodle so that we can reap its benefits - namely the ability to better process and retain material.

Do you doodle? Do you allow your students to doodle?


11.30.2015

Audio on Blogger

I have done some searching for instructions on how to incorporate audio on the Blogger platform. Most solutions are obtuse and kludgey. The best solution I have found so far is to use SoundCloud to host the file and then embed into a blog post. SoundCloud is easy to use although free accounts are limited to 3 hours (per month I assume, as the site does not say) and a 5GB file size max.






As a test, I have uploaded and embedded a recording of an interview I posted back in May of last year.  The interview is with Amy Briggs about using a game in an upper level biology course. The recording quality is not that great as there was mechanical noise in the background, but hopefully this will lead to more and better audio in the future!


10.26.2015

Spring 2016 Courses Available

Courses for Spring 2016 are now available to instructors in Moodle. Please feel free to begin adding materials and getting them ready for the spring. If you have questions as you work, please feel free to contact Instructional Technology and/or check out our documentation.


Courses are hidden from students by default when they are created. When you are ready you will need/want to show the course to students.

To do so:
  1. Open your course in Moodle. 
  2. Click Edit settings from within the Settings block. 
  3. Select “Show” in the Visible drop-down menu located in the General (top) section. 
  4. Save Changes at the bottom of the page.